COMMEMORATION OF THE 98TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE EASTER RISING IN DUBLIN, IRELAND IN 1916 – HELD ON THE NEW HAVEN GREEN, NEW HAVEN CONNECTICUT

On Sunday, April 27th at 9:00 am, on the New Haven Green, there was a Mass for Peace and a Flag Raising ceremony to commemorate the 98th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland.  Mass was celebrated by New Haven priest, Reverend Thomas Kelly. 

Following the 9:00AM Mass there was a ceremony to honor the Irish patriots of 1916, the Forgotten Ten of 1920-21 and THE Hunger Strikers of 1981.

With nearly a turnout of 100 invitees this annual public ceremony serves as a reminder to all ethnic groups that freedom and liberty carry a high price. Local honorees that fled Ireland after the Rising were remembered in a roll call and the original "Proclamation of Freedom" was read by local activist, Margaret O’Hagan Lynch. 

The 1916 Easter Rising occurred when approximately one thousand men and women captured the General Post Office building in Dublin, Ireland in another effort to break the bonds of British rule and gain independence for their country. This became a key turning point on the road to Irish independence. Today marked the 24th year since this event was organized by Michael Lynch, James Reardon and Charlie O’Hagan and conducted openly on the New Haven Green.  It was specifically commemorating the 98th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising.  The address remembering the patriots of 1916 was delivered by Margaret Prendergast. 

Joel Hurliman addressed the gathering with the remembrance of the Forgotten Ten of 1920-21. 

This year also marked the 33rd anniversary of the Hunger Strike at Long Kesh Prison. In 1981, Irish republican volunteers in a British jail on Irish

soil undertook a fast to death to retain their status as political prisoners.

Peadar Mac Maghnuis, National co-Chair for the Eire Nua USA Campaign 2014 and AOH Freedom For All Ireland chair offered his remarks on 1916 Rising reminding the gathering that the Proclamation of Freedom was unfinished business and their voices are needed to help move Ireland to be free, sovereign, united, and a Gaelic nation once again.  He also reminded the gathering that today marked the 100th anniversary of the Cuman Na Mban, the Women’s Unit, which supported the IRB and the patriots of 1916 and continue to be active through today. Mac Maghnuis ended his remarks by reading a poem, “If Jesus”, written by Hunger Striker Mickey Devine on the night before he went on strike.  Mickey was the tenth Hunger Striker of 1981. 

Final remarks were offered by local state senator and majority leader, Martin Looney, who expressed the worthiness of creating change and paid special acknowledgement to the Cuman Na Mban organization.

 Crois

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